Thursday, October 31, 2002

Field Reports from Priestley House - Canton, Mississippi

Written by: Jeff Rent
Case Filed: 10/31/02 - Canton, Mississippi
Executive Producer: Rick Garner

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At a glance, you can draw many parallels between the cities of Selma, Alabama, and Canton, Mississippi. Both are popular sites for Hollywood filmmakers. Both are full of historic antebellum mansions. And both seem to contain an abundance of ghost stories.

The Priestley House in Canton is one of these homes where residents say they're living with spirits. Owner Frankie McMillan says, "I did not believe in ghosts before I moved here. I thought they were silly. And it took me a while living here to believe it."


Wednesday, October 30, 2002

Unexplained: Haunts II Uncovered | Selma: Ghost Writer

Written by: Ouida W. Myers
Case Filed:
10/30/02 - Selma, Alabama
Executive Producer:
Rick Garner

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Kathryn Tucker Windham is probably best known by young readers for her books about Jeffery and other Ghosts. Thirteen Alabama Ghosts and Jeffery (1964) written with Margaret Gillis Figh, was her first book about Jeffery and other ghosts. Other titles include Jeffery Introduces Thirteen More Southern Ghosts (1971), Thirteen Georgia Ghosts and Jeffery (1973), Thirteen Mississippi Ghosts and Jeffery (1974), Thirteen Tennessee Ghosts and Jeffery (1976), and Jeffery's Latest Thirteen: More Alabama Ghosts (1982). In the words of Kathryn Tucker Windham, "My desire is to preserve our Southern ghost tales-the true ones-before they are lost." She certainly seems to have satisfied that desire.

Tuesday, October 29, 2002

Unexplained: Haunts II Uncovered | Selma: Southern Ghost Town

Written by: Jeff Rent
Case Filed:
10/29/02 - Cahawba, Alabama
Executive Producer: Rick Garner

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Cahawba was once Alabama's state capital (1820-1826) and a thriving antebellum river town. It became a ghost town shortly after the Civil War. Today it is an important archaeological site and a place of picturesque ruins.

As early as 4,000 years ago Indians occupied Cahawba, and the Spanish explorer DeSoto may have visited a large Indian village located there in 1540.
In 1819 the state of Alabama was carved out of the wilderness. Cahawba, its capital city, was an undeveloped town site, a gift from President James Monroe to the new state. Consequently, Alabama's legislature was forced to find temporary accommodations in Huntsville until a statehouse could be built. By 1820, however, Cahawba was a fully functioning state capital.


Monday, October 28, 2002

Unexplained: Haunts II Uncovered | Selma: Ghosts of the Past

Written by: Jeff Rent
Case Filed: 10/28/02 - Selma, Alabama
Executive Producer: Rick Garner

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Civil Rights: The March from Selma to Montgomery
Over a century of amazing history has taken place in Selma. While one struggle ended there - the Civil War ended with the fall of Selma on April 2, 1865 - another struggle began almost to the day on March 7, 1965, with a violent beginning to the fight for voting Civil Rights of African-Americans.

Most African Americans did not have the opportunity to exercise the right to vote in many of the Southern states. Mississippi and Alabama were very repressive and ripe for change during the mid 1960s. Civil rights workers became active in gaining the right to vote for African Americans.