Wednesday, November 6, 2002

Field Reports from Selma, Alabama

Written by: Rick Garner
Case Filed:
11/06/02 - Selma, Alabama
Executive Producer:
Rick Garner



When I first learned that there was a city Chamber of Commerce sponsoring a "Ghost Tour" in the town of Selma, I was immediately intrigued. Through all my research for this series, this was truly a unique discovery. Yet, I've also concluded that there are so many odd and fascinating stories out there...I'll never locate more than a third of them!

After other locations had fallen through, Selma became the site for the sequel to Unexplained: Haunts from 2001. That program featured a year's worth of paranormal investigations from several locations in three states. So, you can imagine my concern of what we would, or more importantly would not, find in the one single location of Selma.


Thursday, October 31, 2002

Field Reports from Priestley House - Canton, Mississippi

Written by: Jeff Rent
Case Filed: 10/31/02 - Canton, Mississippi
Executive Producer: Rick Garner

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At a glance, you can draw many parallels between the cities of Selma, Alabama, and Canton, Mississippi. Both are popular sites for Hollywood filmmakers. Both are full of historic antebellum mansions. And both seem to contain an abundance of ghost stories.

The Priestley House in Canton is one of these homes where residents say they're living with spirits. Owner Frankie McMillan says, "I did not believe in ghosts before I moved here. I thought they were silly. And it took me a while living here to believe it."


Wednesday, October 30, 2002

Unexplained: Haunts II Uncovered | Selma: Ghost Writer

Written by: Ouida W. Myers
Case Filed:
10/30/02 - Selma, Alabama
Executive Producer:
Rick Garner

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Kathryn Tucker Windham is probably best known by young readers for her books about Jeffery and other Ghosts. Thirteen Alabama Ghosts and Jeffery (1964) written with Margaret Gillis Figh, was her first book about Jeffery and other ghosts. Other titles include Jeffery Introduces Thirteen More Southern Ghosts (1971), Thirteen Georgia Ghosts and Jeffery (1973), Thirteen Mississippi Ghosts and Jeffery (1974), Thirteen Tennessee Ghosts and Jeffery (1976), and Jeffery's Latest Thirteen: More Alabama Ghosts (1982). In the words of Kathryn Tucker Windham, "My desire is to preserve our Southern ghost tales-the true ones-before they are lost." She certainly seems to have satisfied that desire.

Tuesday, October 29, 2002

Unexplained: Haunts II Uncovered | Selma: Southern Ghost Town

Written by: Jeff Rent
Case Filed:
10/29/02 - Cahawba, Alabama
Executive Producer: Rick Garner

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Cahawba was once Alabama's state capital (1820-1826) and a thriving antebellum river town. It became a ghost town shortly after the Civil War. Today it is an important archaeological site and a place of picturesque ruins.

As early as 4,000 years ago Indians occupied Cahawba, and the Spanish explorer DeSoto may have visited a large Indian village located there in 1540.
In 1819 the state of Alabama was carved out of the wilderness. Cahawba, its capital city, was an undeveloped town site, a gift from President James Monroe to the new state. Consequently, Alabama's legislature was forced to find temporary accommodations in Huntsville until a statehouse could be built. By 1820, however, Cahawba was a fully functioning state capital.


Monday, October 28, 2002

Unexplained: Haunts II Uncovered | Selma: Ghosts of the Past

Written by: Jeff Rent
Case Filed: 10/28/02 - Selma, Alabama
Executive Producer: Rick Garner

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Civil Rights: The March from Selma to Montgomery
Over a century of amazing history has taken place in Selma. While one struggle ended there - the Civil War ended with the fall of Selma on April 2, 1865 - another struggle began almost to the day on March 7, 1965, with a violent beginning to the fight for voting Civil Rights of African-Americans.

Most African Americans did not have the opportunity to exercise the right to vote in many of the Southern states. Mississippi and Alabama were very repressive and ripe for change during the mid 1960s. Civil rights workers became active in gaining the right to vote for African Americans.

Friday, September 27, 2002

Dark Side of the Blues

Written by: Jeff Rent & Rick Garner
Case Filed:
9/27/02 - Jackson, Mississippi
Executive Producer:
Rick Garner
Special Thanks:
Steve LaVere, Delta Haze
Still images in video from film
"Can't You Hear the Wind Howl?: The Life & Music of Robert Johnson" Used with permission.


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The huge cotton fields of the Delta produced more than just cotton. In fact, the immense Dockery Plantation may be the exact location of the birth of the Blues. Slaves and then sharecroppers communicated across the fields in a style called "field hollering." This became the Blues we know today.

After the Blues' birth in the fields, Clarksdale, Mississippi, would become the Home of the Blues and is now linked to a rather mysterious chapter in Blues history.


Thursday, August 29, 2002

Starchild Mystery

Written by: Jeff Rent
Case Filed: 08/29/02 - Jackson, Mississippi
Executive Producer: Rick Garner

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The mystery of the Starchild skull began in Mexico nearly 70 years ago when a young girl discovered it in a cave. In that cave was a human female skeleton lying on the floor with a small hand sticking out of the dirt, wrapped around the arm of the skeleton.

The young girl began to dig.

"She found in a shallow grave another skeleton of a smaller being that she said was misshapen all over," says Lloyd Pye, the author and researcher for the Starchild Research Project.


Thursday, August 1, 2002

Field Reports from Duff Green Mansion

Written by: Rick Garner & Dean McKnight
Case Filed:
8/1/2002 - Vicksburg, Mississippi
Executive Producer:
Rick Garner

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Breakfast Cook Catherine Miller is emphatic in her opinion of the Duff Green, "To me, the Duff Green Mansion is one of the most beautiful places I have every worked."

Employee Lib Galloway agrees, "You know, as many people that have died in this house - it's gonna feel spooky. However, it didn't. I felt like the house was sheltering me, protecting me, and taking care of me."


Thursday, June 27, 2002

Cooper's Well: Saratoga of the South

Written by: Rebecca Drake (used by permission)
Case Filed: 6/27/02 - Raymond, Mississippi
Executive Producer: Rick Garner


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Reverend Preston Cooper, a Methodist minister, bought land near Raymond in 1837 as a romantic location for his home. After building his home on the crest of a hill he was in need of increased water supply so he hired a man to dig a well at the foot of the hill. After going down 30 feet he struck a rock bed and gave up. What Reverend Cooper did not realize at the time was that for the next several years he would be "haunted" by a recurring dream in which an angel would appear and say "Dig, Cooper, Dig".


Thursday, March 21, 2002

Angels Among Us: Reunion

Written by: Cindy Carter and Tim Freeny
Case Filed:
3/21/02 - Jackson, Mississippi
Executive Producer:
Rick Garner

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"I'm going to hug your neck," said Scott Watkins, when he met Sarah Haller. This reunion comes almost two months after Sarah was hit by a car on I-55 South.

She was involved in a fender-bender, and had stepped out of her car when another car struck her from behind. Scott Watkins saw the whole thing.


Thursday, February 28, 2002

Angels Among Us

Written by: Cindy Carter
Case Filed: Thursday,
2/28/02 - Jackson, Mississippi
Executive Producer:
Rick Garner


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Angels...messengers from God. In the Hebrew Bible, there are over 300 references to these heavenly hosts in the Old and New Testaments. Looking outside of the Christian and Jewish faiths, there are references to angels in Islam. The ancient Egyptians also believed angels visited their dead.

Do angels really exist? And if so, do they visit us in times of need? Sarah 
Haller has no doubts.


Tuesday, February 19, 2002

Jackson's Worst Disaster

Written by: Jeff Rent
Case Filed: 2/19/02 - Jackson, Mississippi
Executive Producer:
Rick Garner

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Few know of the horrific past a quiet block in Downtown Jackson has experienced.


"It was Jackson's version of the Twin Towers," says Historian Grady Howell, Jr. He has studied the event in detail and recounts what happened when Jackson's Confederate arsenal exploded on November 5th, 1862.

"And at 3:10 that afternoon, this quiet little knoll that we're standing on right now and where that building is pretty much located turned into a volcano. According to the witnesses, it blew the place into atoms. The cannonballs that were being refilled were exploding, the bullets were exploding, the wreckage was ablaze, bodies were thrown all over the place."